Make Your Lifestyle Heart-Healthy

The millions of Americans diagnosed with heart and cardiovascular diseases can benefit from making healthy choices in their day-to-day lives.  Follow a healthy diet Eating a nutritious diet is a proven way to reduce the risk for heart disease. These are the elements of a heart-healthy diet (amounts listed are for adults): Eat 2 cups fresh fruits and 2-1/2 to 3 cups vegetables every day. Limit saturated and trans fats by using olive oil or other vegetable oils instead of butter or margarine. Remember also to limit the total fat intake to less than 30% of your daily calories. Eat
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New Year’s Resolutions, Take Two! Five Tips to Make Them Stick

If you’re like most people, you’ve probably struggled to keep your New Year’s resolutions past the first week (or maybe even the first day), right? We all know they are more easily made than kept, but there are ways to turn them into lifelong habits. MetroIPC recommends following the S.M.A.R.T. system, which includes the following five steps: 1. Set specific goals. The more specific the resolutions, the more likely they will be followed. Rather than make general promises to eat better or exercise more, make a resolution to eat five servings of fruit and vegetables daily or walk 30 minutes
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10 Tips: Healthy Aging Month

  Republished from Healthy Aging Magazine   Think it’s too late to “rein­vent” your­self? Think again. Accord­ing to Car­olyn Wor­thing­ton, editor-in-chief of Healthy Aging® Mag­a­zine and exec­u­tive direc­tor of Healthy Aging®, “it’s never too late to find a new career, a new sport, pas­sion, or hobby.” Wor­thing­ton is the cre­ator of Sep­tem­ber is Healthy Aging® Month, an annual health obser­vance designed to focus national atten­tion on the pos­i­tive aspects of grow­ing older. Now in its sec­ond decade, Wor­thing­ton says Sep­tem­ber is Healthy Aging® Month pro­vides inspi­ra­tion and prac­ti­cal ideas for adults, ages 50-plus, to improve their phys­i­cal, men­tal, social, and finan­cial
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The Facts About Cholesterol

  September is Cholesterol Education Month and no matter how healthy you may appear, it is important for everyone to know the facts about high cholesterol. According to the CDC, over 102 million adults in America have cholesterol levels over 200 mg/dL, which is above what is considered healthy. Those who carry high levels of cholesterol in the blood are twice as likely to develop heart disease compared to those who maintain ideal levels. Cholesterol is a fat-like substance that produces naturally in the body as well as some foods. An excess of cholesterol in the body will deposit itself
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Flu Season: Should You Vaccinate?

As summer draws to a close, most people face several important questions this upcoming fall.  Will the Redskins finally have a decent season? Is there a limit to the pumpkin flavored items one can consume? Should I get vaccinated for the flu this year? Although the answers to some of these questions remain ambiguous, getting vaccinated should be at the top of everyone’s priority list. Nobody actually enjoys getting sick, yet somehow it is still a challenge to get people the flu vaccine each year. Every excuse is different, but there are several misconceptions that prevent people from following through with
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Suntan and Sunburn

Republished from The Journal of the American Medical Association   A suntan or sunburn is a sign that skin has been damaged by ultraviolet (UV) rays. Melanin is the pigment that gives skin its color. People with light skin have less melanin than people with dark skin. When skin is damaged by UV rays, the body makes more melanin to try to protect against further damage. This extra melanin gives suntanned skin its darker appearance. But a suntan does not provide good protection against the harmful effects of UV rays. In fact, a suntan is a sign that skin has already
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The Importance of Sexual Health

Sexual health can be a sensitive topic for some, however, you should not be afraid to raise questions and discuss them with your physician. The CDC estimates that there are about 20 million new Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) cases a year in the United States. Some of these have uncomfortable symptoms, however, many STDs can be asymptomatic. The most common infections include HPV, chlamydia, trichomoniasis, gonorrhea, HSV-2, syphilis, HIV, and Hepatitis B. In addition, some sexually transmitted infections are generally curable (chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis, trichomoniasis), while others remain lifelong infections that can significantly impact one’s health. If you are or
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The Facts About Lyme Disease

Lyme disease is a bacterial infection spread through the bite of blacklegged ticks infected with the Borrelia burgdorferi bacterium.  The typical indicators of Lyme disease are fever, headache, fatigue and a characteristic “bull’s-eye” skin rash. Late spring/early summer is the highest-risk season for Lyme disease, but it should be noted that adult ticks are active year round and anytime the weather is above 40 degrees Fahrenheit. According to the CDC, approximately 95% of Lyme disease cases in the U.S. can be found in 14 states concentrated throughout the Northeast and Midwest including Maryland and Virginia. If left untreated, the Lyme
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Your MetroIPC Patient Coordinator

  Kawana Ringold is a Patient Care Coordinator at MetroIPC.  Our coordinators serve as a liaison between our MetroIPC patients and providers.  Kawana shares more about her role and what MetroIPC is doing to provide ongoing quality care for our patients.   Please tell us a little bit about yourself. I am a married, mother of three who is currently enrolled at UMUC for my Bachelors degree. I have worked as a Medical Assistant as well as in a clinical and administrative capacity for Riverside Health Systems, Walker Jones Health Center, Unity Health Care and the DC Department of Corrections.  As of June
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